Amazon.com: ASRock Cable (BTC PRO KIT): Computers ...

[USA-IL] [H] 5x VEGA 64, 6U Mining Chassis (holds 6+ cards), EVGA 1600W PSU, Asrock H110 Pro BTC+, ADATA 128GB NVMe, Ballistix Sport LT 16GB DDR4 [W] local cash, PayPal

I purchased all of these new and can provide receipts for all. Ideally this would go as a whole package. I still have the 6U case shipping box, so shipping won't be difficult.
 
Setup info: Currently running Windows 10 and setup to automatically disable/enable Vega's on reboot and begin mining. If it's purchased as a package I can leave the setup as-is, show you how it's configured and how to troubleshoot, if necessary.
 
Prices are OBO and do not include shipping. I'm willing to part out but would prefer to sell as a package to save time/money. Also offering a discount for the package.
 
Please let me know if you would like more details. Thanks
 
Item Description QTY Price Status
GPU XFX Radeon Rx Vega 64 RX-VEGMTBFX6 3 0 $550 n/a
GPU Sapphire Radeon RX VEGA 64 LIMITED EDITION 21275-01-20G 2 0 $650 n/a
Case 6U GPU Bitcoin Mining Rig Server Case - 6 Fans Pre-Installed - Cooling vents w/ Dropdown Fan Backplate for Easy Internal Acces 1 $150 Available
PSU EVGA SuperNOVA 1600 G2 80+ GOLD, 1600W Fully Modular NVIDIA SLI and Crossfire Ready 10 Year Warranty Power Supply 120-G2-1600-X1 1 $350 Available
Mobo ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ 13GPU Mining Motherboard 1 $75 Available
SSD ADATA SU800 M.2 2280 128GB Ultimate 3D NAND Solid State Drive (ASU800NS38-128GT-C) 1 $25 Available
RAM Ballistix Sport LT 16GB Kit (8GBx2) DDR4 2666 MT/s (PC4-21300) SR x8 DIMM 288-Pin - BLS2K8G4D26BFSEK (Red) 1 $125 Available
Package deal $3675 - 10% = $3300
timestamps
edit: clarified about pricing and package deal above. edit: updated qty on listing.
submitted by november84 to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

My Experience: From FX-8350 to R7-1700

Upgrading from an FX-8350 to a R7-1700.
Just a bit about me – I have been building computers since the mid 80’s. I missed the 8-inch floppy disk era, but came on board when dual 5.25” was considered mainstream and a 10-megabyte full-height HDD was the mark of a power user. The first computer I built for my own enjoyment was an AMD X5-133 (a factory overclocked 486 faster than the Pentium-75), and I’ve used a wide variety of systems since then, including a Pentium Pro-200 which served me well in college and a K6-2 which I took to quite a few LAN parties. While I’ve always had Intel notebooks, my PC’s have been AMD for quite some time now. I decided to upgrade my current main machine, which is an FX-8350 with a mild 4.4Ghz overclock. I was using 2x8GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600 and a Sapphire Radeon Fury Nitro. While I know the R5-1600x would be a better bet for a pure gaming build, I have a soft spot for 8-core machines. I had been tempted to pull the trigger on an i7-7700k for a while, but the timing never worked out. But when I found the R7-1700 at a deep discount and an X370 motherboard on the shelf next to it – I couldn’t resist the siren call of a new build.
Here are my thoughts about the process:
AM4 is physically the same as AM3 from a build perspective, except for the mounting holes. I don’t know what was so important about making the holes have different offsets, but this makes it much more difficult to get quality cooling. Not all manufacturers have brackets yet, and I’m still waiting on Cooler Master to release the brackets for my Siedon 240.
The new motherboard feels very different from my AM3 board. My FX-8350 sat on an ASUS M5A99FX Pro R2.0. It was, for lack of a better word, a very workstation-ish board. 4 PCIx16 slots, 10x USB ports (2 of the USB 3.0), triple USB 2.0 front panel headers (and a USB 3.0 front panel header as well), eSATA on the rear panel, beefy VRM and Northbridge cooling, Toslink output for audio, and so on. The board itself is full of tiny components, support chips, and ports. Granted, many of these connectors are outdated (eSATA and USB2.0), and the PCIe is only 2.0 instead of current-gen 3.0, but there is a LOT of connectivity. Few people paired an FX chip with triple of quad-GPU for gaming, but I know a fair number of people used these for bitcoin mining back before there was widespread ASIC support and back then GPU mining was the most cost-effective way to mint cryptocurrency. Extra PCIe slots could be used for dedicated video capture, PCI-based storage, a RAID card, etc... Having 4 full-size slots allows this kind of flexibility. The new motherboard is an Asrock Fatal1ty x370 Gaming K4. It does not feel very workstation-ish at all. It has only two 16x PCIe slots (and when they are both in use they are only 8x), 8 USB ports on the rear panel, and a much less “busy” motherboard. Very few support chips litter its surface. Instead of a workstation component, it feels much more like a luxury consumer product. This is not a bad thing – just something I noticed while building the system. The rear IO shield is red and black to match its gaming aesthetic, it includes things like premium audio (including a very nice headphone amplifier for the front panel connectors), and while it only has 8x USB ports on the back, 6 of them are USB 3.0 and two of them (including a type-C connector) are USB 3.1 gen2. It includes RGB LED’s under the chipset heatsink and three separate RGB LED controller ports (one of which is used for the boxed cooler), Intel gigabit Ethernet, and dual M.2 slots (one of which connected directly to the CPU). It is very different in “feel” from the older ASUS board, even down to things like a shroud for the external connectors and metal-reinforced PCI slots. I must say, its more aggressive appearance and near-empty areas appeal to me. It does, however, funnel the builder into a particular configuration: limited fast storage through the M.2 slots, slow(er) storage through the 6x SATA ports, all external devices should be USB 3. Personally, these limitations didn’t restrict me for this build, since that was how I was going to set it up anyway, but the fewer connectivity choices might cause some pause for others. The only thing I don’t like about this board is the 20 second POST times. 20 seconds every time. Resuming from sleep is very fast, just reboots are slow. That’s really it. I have no substantive complaints other than that – well, and the memory speed limitations – more on that below.
The Wraith Spire cooler is without doubt the best looking box cooler I’ve ever seen. The symmetrical cylinder look, combined with the LED logo and RGB ring are very striking. I can see why many people have asked to order one, though I think for the 1700X and 1800X they are better off without it. I’ll explain why further down.
Initial hardware setup was very easy. I was able to flash to the newest 2.0 BIOS without any hassle using a DOS USB flash boot drive. The 2.0 BIOS has the newest AGESA code from AMD, as well as support for the R5 processors and better DDR4 compatibility. I didn’t want to cheap out on RAM since apparently Ryzen is sensitive to DDR4 speeds for the latency between cores. I bought the cheapest 16GB DDR4-3200 kit I could find (the EVGA SuperSC 2x8GB), for which I paid $115. While I was not able to get it to boot at 3200, I could get 2933 simply by activating XMP, then manually changing the speed from 3200 to 3000. I then tested it with MemTest86 for two complete cycles, which it passed without errors. I have encountered zero memory issues with these RAM sticks running at 2933. Since this motherboard does not officially support DDR4-3200 at all, I figure this is a good outcome. I am curious to know whether anyone has gotten 3200 on this board – that is, whether the lack of 3200 memory on Asrock’s QVL is a marketing issue or an actual hardware limitation – but I didn’t want to spend nearly double that amount in order to get AM4 verified memory (G.Skill’s FlareX), and 2966 seemed fast enough from the benchmark results I had read.
My old setup had a Samsung 850 EVO 256gb SATA6 drive as the primary boot/gaming drive. It seemed plenty fast but it had become too small for my needs, so this seemed like a good opportunity to buy a new SSD. I originally thought the NVMe drives would be out of my price range, but I bought the Intel 600p 512GB drive for only $10 more than I would have paid for a premium SATA6 drive. Though the 600p is without doubt the SLOWEST NVMe drive out there, it has 3x the read speed as the SATA6 drives, and most of what I am doing with it is trying to get quicker load times. If I was using it for professional workloads (as a video editing scratch drive, for example), I would need much higher sustained write speeds and then Samsung would be the obvious answer. I just didn’t want to spend an extra $80 on write performance that I’d never notice, and the 600p has been an excellent boot/gaming drive.
Ok, back to the Wraith Spire. I tend to have bad luck with the silicon lottery. My FX-8350 was not able to be stable above 4.4Ghz with reasonable temperatures. I was hoping I would be able to get better results from the R7-1700, since general reports indicated that it overclocked well. Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell how good of an overclock I am getting since I can find no good information about maximum recommended temperatures for this chip. Some people say 75c is the maximum safe temp. Others say 75c is a fine everyday 24/7 temp. Others say they are running it at 80c all the time without any issues at all. Steve at Techspot was getting 88c and 90c when overclocking the 1600X and 1500X using the stock coolers and without any instability – were those dangerous temps or totally fine? Nobody seems to know. I like my overclocks to be set-and-forget. I want to get it dialed in and then leave it for years without worrying that it will burn up or degrade or that in this or that application I have to turn back to stock speeds because of the thermals. Since I don’t know what max safe thermals are, I just have to guess based on stock thermals.
For stock speeds, the Wraith Spire does a good job. It is very quiet, and after a few BIOS fan-curve tweaks, it keeps the chip around 35-38 at idle, and around 68-70 on Prime95 (Small FFT, for maximum temperature generation). Incidentally, it also hits 70 if I run Cinebench a bunch of times in a row as well, so I don’t consider the Small FFT test to be totally unrealistic for the load this chip might encounter. From what I can tell, these are good normal temps. I can get 3.5Ghz by simply changing the multiplier and leaving the voltage at stock. This gives Cinebench numbers around the 1550 mark (roughly 6900k levels). Prime95 shows a modest boost in temperatures of 3-4 degrees C, and was stable even for several hours. If I push it to 3.6Ghz at stock voltage the system is unstable. At 3.7Ghz (the 1700’s boost speed for single-threaded loads) it is stable only if I give it 1.3v. While that is a totally fine voltage (AMD recommends up to 1.35v for 24/7), the Wraith Spire cannot handle a Prime95 Small FFT load anymore. I shut down the test and reverted the OC when the CPU read 89c. Given the fact that the Spire was meant to cool a 65w chip (and so probably is rated at no more than 85-95w), this is not a terribly surprising temperature – I wish I knew if it was dangerous. I have no doubt that a 240mm radiator or even a decent tower cooler will be more than enough to cool down my 3.7Ghz R7-1700. I am a little jealous of the people who just set the multiplier to 3700 and are good to go – lower voltages probably mean the Spire would be enough. But for me, it was not to be. I was halfway tempted to see at what temperature the chip would reduce its clock speed, but I didn’t want to burn up a chip I had just bought – might as well wait until I get bigger and better cooling to OC it to the 3.8-3.9 I hope it will reach.
Other than the OC temps it has been smooth sailing. Gaming feels more fluid than with the FX, even in games that I always thought were GPU-limited and/or running at 60fps with VSYNC on. Especially games that are sensitive to single-core performance (Heroes of the Storm is my latest addiction) there is a definite boost in 1% low and 0.1% low FPS. I have been using the Ryzen Balanced power plan from AMD and it seems to do a fantastic job keeping temps low when idle and letting the cores ramp up really fast when needed. I need to test whether the lack of core parking prevents it from hitting the 3.7Ghz boost as much as the regular Balanced plan allows. I think a simple CineBench single-thread comparison will do the trick.
I also tried streaming a bit – and it was able to generate 1080p60fps at x264-medium settings without being noticeable while in game. Later I edited some video of my kids – the final render speed was SOOOO fast. I am, on the whole, very happy with my upgrade. I get better single-core performance, much much better multi-core performance, along with faster disk speeds, and a more modern platform (with RGB lighting, M.2, USB 3.1, etc…).
Now if only I could find out appropriate temperatures…..
submitted by Morphon to Amd [link] [comments]

Just got a bunch of ASROCK 'BTC PRO' equipment in...

I recently launched a new website selling computer components. We currently accept Bitcoin and I'm hoping we can soon accept Litecoin.
We just got a bunch of new ASROCK kit in that looks really nice.
We are selling them at knock down prices all week.
http://www.cointech.co.uk/mining-equipment/asrock-h81-pro-btc-skt-1150-bitcoin-mining-motherboard.html
http://www.cointech.co.uk/mining-equipment/asrock-btc-pro-kit-pcie-x1-to-pcie-x16-adapter-pcbs-and-cables.html
Apologies for the shameless plugging but with Gyft buying all the Reddit advertising up we are having to resort to some guerrilla tactics!
submitted by cointech to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

Trouble getting into BIOS/Install Windows 7 [New Computer][MOTHERBOARD]

Hey! I'm having some difficulties setting up a new rig. It boots up fine, but when I get to the "choose language" page of the Windows 7 installation the rig either freezes or doesn't recognize the mouse or keyboard.
I've read that some problems might arise with legacy USB devices, and so I've attempted to get to the BIOS and resolve the issue. When I press "delete" on boot, the screen goes dark and has a singular white dot. I have gotten to the BIOS once during the process, but this was before I thought to edit the USB setting. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!
EDIT: I do get the one short beep during startup from the onboard speaker.
Build: MOBO: ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ 13GPU Mining Motherboard CryptoCurrency
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 8GB (2x4GB) DDR4 DRAM 2400MHz (PC4 19200) C16 Memory Kit - Black
Storage: SanDisk SSD PLUS 120GB Solid State Drive (SDSSDA-120G-G26) [Newest Version]
CPU: Intel BX80677G3930 7th Gen Celeron Desktop Processors Power Supply:
Power Supply 1600W Full Modular Power Supply 90 Gold For 6 GPU Rig Eth Ethereum Bitcoin Mining, GPU 6+2Pin, Miner's choice
submitted by qurty80 to buildapchelp [link] [comments]

[CANADA-BC] [H] Crypto Currency Mining Enclosure and hardware FULL setup sale [W] $ or Bitcoin

I own a crypto currency mining investment company and I'm selling off the current hardware setup. It has been in use since mid-March of 2014. I've had a series of unfortunate events occur in my personal life that require me to sell off my business's hardware and other personal items.
This is for a firm priced sale, I am looking for a buyer that is either wanting to get into the mining business and wants a GPU based setup that can tackle all the new algorithms VS ASIC based setups that go obsolete within months and have no resale value. Or a buyer that wants to expand their mining farm or mining business and would love a plug-n-play type setup where the only thing they are required to do is have one power feed wired into their warehouse or home panel. This would be for local pickup only most likely. It will require the buyer to have a truck or to rent a u-haul type of moving truck. The system is roughly 60 inches tall by 95 inches long by 24 inches wide, not sure on its weight but moveable if the cards are removed(the cards are designed to be plug-n-play as well, no screws, just pop out pop in.) and runs at 240v for PC hardware and 120v for fans/misc regular appliance plugins(routers/switches etc).
The enclosure houses 8 systems which consist of 46 R9 280x video cards (it has room for expansion), has its own built in surge protection system to withstand lightning and other outside-the-enclosure based surges, whole system runs at 240v for best efficiency, has a 100amp breaker panel which is attached to the enclosure for maximum expansion.
The enclosure has 6x20 inch box fans which provide the 24/7 constant air flow for the video cards. I have two other 20 inch box fans that are for in and out airflow for fresh air circulation. All video cards are easy to access and can easily add or remove cards to/from the unit. I built the enclosure design in-house.
Serious inquiries ONLY, I have priced this as fair market price for used hardware among the enclosure costs which include the power panel, surge protection, cable runs, professional electrical hardware/electrician fees etc. This is a full plug and play type enclosure setup for any mining farm out there. Originally built for $33000~, I'm strictly selling it at a fair hardware priced value with cutting out a lot of the fee's that you would have to pay for an electrician to wire up your own custom enclosure and the electrical hardware. Cash or Bitcoins only.
Asking $15000 Canadian firm. Also I am located around Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Pictures: https://imageshack.com/a/rmAz/1
It consists of the following hardware:
GPUS:
-40x Powercolor Radeon R9 280X OC 1030MHZ 3GB 6.0GBPS GDDR5 DVI HDMI 2XMINIDP PCI-E Video Card http://www.powercolor.com/Global/products_features.asp?id=512
-6x ASUS Radeon R9 280X OC 1070MHZ 3GB 6.4GHZ GDDR5 2xDVI HDMI DisplayPort PCI-E Video Card [R9280X-DC2T-3GD5] http://www.asus.com/Graphics_Cards/R9280XDC2T3GD5/
Motherboards:
-5x H81 Pro BTC http://www.asrock.com/mb/intel/h81%20pro%20btc/
-2x Gigabyte 990FXA-UD3 AMD990FX ATX AM3+ DDR3 4PCI-E16 2PCI-E1 1PCI SLI SATA3 USB3.0 Motherboard [GA-990FXA-UD3] http://ca.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3996#ov
-1x asrock 970 Extreme3 http://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/970%20Extreme3/
Power Supplies(All PLATINUM RATED for best efficiency and running at 240v):
-14x Corsair AX1200I 1200W Digital ATX 12V 80 Plus Platinum Modular Power Supply 140mm Fan http://www.corsair.com/en/ax1200i-digital-atx-power-supply-1200-watt-80-plus-platinum-certified-fully-modular-psu
-1x Corsair AX860I 860W Digital ATX 12V 80 Plus Platinum Modular Power Supply http://www.corsair.com/en/ax860i-digital-atx-power-supply-860-watt-80-plus-platinum-certified-fully-modular-psu
-1x Antec HCP-1300 Platinum power supply http://www.antec.com/product.php?id=706569&fid=343
CPU's:
-5x Intel Pentium G3220 Dual Core 3.0GHZ Processor LGA1150 Haswell 3MB Cache Retail [BX80646G3220] http://ark.intel.com/products/77773/Intel-Pentium-Processor-G3220-3M-Cache-3_00-GHz
-1x AMD FX 4-Core Black Edition FX-4130 [fd4130frgubox] http://products.amd.com/en-gb/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=808&f1=&f2=&f3=&f4=&f5=&f6=&f7=&f8=&f9=&f10=&f11=&f12=
-1x AMD Athlon II X2 250 (3.0GHz, 65W, 2MB total dedicated L2 cache, 4000MHz HyperTransport™ bus, socket AM3) http://products.amd.com/en-gb/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=691
-1x AMD Athlon II X2 270 Regor Dual-Core 3.4GHz Socket AM3 65W Desktop Processor [ADX270OCGMBOX] http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K10/AMD-Athlon%20II%20X2%20270%20-%20ADX270OCK23GM%20(ADX270OCGMBOX).html
Memory:
-1x Corsair XMS3 CMX4GX3M2A1600C9 4GB DDR3 2X2GB DDR3-1600 CL 9-9-9-24 Core i5 Dual Channel Memory Kit [CMX4GX3M2A1600C9] http://www.corsair.com/en/cmx4gx3m2a1600c9
-1x Corsair Vengeance Blue CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B 8GB 2X4GB DDR3-1600 CL9-9-9-24 Dual Channel Memory Kit [CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B] http://www.corsair.com/en/vengeance-8gb-dual-channel-ddr3-memory-kit-cmz8gx3m2a1600c9b
-1x Kingston HyperX 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX http://www.kingston.com/en/memory/search/?partid=khx1600c9d3k2/8gx
-1x Corsair 6GB Triple Channel DDR3 Memory Kit (TR3X6G1600C8D) http://www.corsair.com/en/tr3x6g1600c8d
Hard Drives:
USB flash drives for hard drives
-2x Kingston 8GB USB3.0 DataTraveler 100 G3 USB Flash Drive [DT100G3/8GBCR] http://www.kingston.com/datasheets/dt100g3_en.pdf
-6x Kingston 16GB USB3.0 DataTraveler 100 G3 USB Flash Drive [DT100G3/16GBCR] http://www.kingston.com/datasheets/dt100g3_en.pdf
Misc accessories/electrical for the enclosure:
-1x D-LINK DSS-8+ Unmanaged Desktop Switch, 8-Port, 10/100 Mbps http://www.dlink.com/si/sl/support/product/dss-8plus-8-port-10-100-desktop-switch
-all cat5e cables included.
-18x Heavy-Duty Power Cord, 15A, 14AWG (IEC-320-C13 to NEMA L6-20P) 6-ft.(2 spare for expansion can order more however). http://www.tripplite.com/heavy-duty-power-cord-iec-320-c13-to-nema-l6-20p-6-ft~P011006/
-1x Leviton 51120-1 Panel Protector, 120/240-Volt(surge protector) http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ProductDetail.jsp?partnumber=51120-1§ion=39955
-18x Leviton 2320 20 Amp, 250 Volt, Flush Mounting Locking Receptacle, Grounding, Industrial Grade, V-0-MAX (Black) http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ProductDetail.jsp?partnumber=2320§ion=40369
-2x Belkin 12 Outlet Home/Office Surge Protector with Phone/Ethernet/Coaxial Protection and Extended Cord 4156 Joules http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HPX46U/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
-9x Lasko #3720 20" Weather-Shield Performance Box Fans http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BOCD1Y/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
submitted by phi0x to hardwareswap [link] [comments]

Time for a upgrade! Any input on my list?

Hey everyone - I am ready to build a dedicated gaming rig, and maybe mine for BitCoins on the side. I already have a large Antec Performance series case, HD's and DVD drive. Here is the list of my upgrades to get,
This list is around $1300 CDN. This would be the high end of my budget of this upgrade. I am all ears for cheaper items that can perform just as well. I am a programmer by profession so when I enter the realm of picking high end mobo's and video cards - I feel a bit in over my head. Thank you everyone for making this such a great subreddit.
submitted by rehs to buildapc [link] [comments]

Asrock 13 GPU Mining Monster !!! The H110 Pro BTC+ How to build a 13 GPU mining rig with ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ Best Bitcoin Mining Software 🔥 Crypto Block Pro V2 3 ... 13 GPU Mining Rig with ASRock H110 Pro BTC ASROCK BTC PRO Kit

ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ 13GPU Mining Motherboard Cryptocurrency 3.8 out of 5 stars 390. 8 ... ASRock Item model number BTC PRO KIT Item Weight 3.53 ounces Product Dimensions 6.7 x 2.2 x 2.2 inches Item Dimensions LxWxH 6.7 x 2.2 x 2.2 inches Computer Memory Type DDR3 SDRAM Manufacturer ASRock ASIN B00ITG1ZWY Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No Date First Available March 12, 2014 Additional ... Bitcoin Mining Pc - Unser Testsieger . Unsere Redakteure begrüßen Sie als Kunde auf unserer Seite. Unsere Mitarbeiter haben es uns zur Aufgabe gemacht, Ware unterschiedlichster Variante ausführlichst zu vergleichen, dass Endverbraucher unmittelbar den Bitcoin Mining Pc sich aneignen können, den Sie als Kunde für geeignet halten. Bitcoin Mining Pc - Nehmen Sie unserem Sieger. Unser Testerteam hat unterschiedlichste Hersteller & Marken ausführlich getestet und wir zeigen Ihnen hier die Resultate. Selbstverständlich ist jeder Bitcoin Mining Pc unmittelbar bei Amazon im Lager und somit sofort bestellbar. Während die bekannten Fachmärkte leider seit vielen Jahren ausnahmslos durch Wucherpreise und zudem sehr schwacher ... ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ is ready to mine right out of box, no need to do any additional bios setup to enable multi GPU mining. Hybrid GPU system is very popular among hardcore miners, this motherboard is ready for up to 13 mixed AMD+NVIDIA GPU mining under Windows10, not only that, H110 Pro BTC+ is also fully compatible with professional mining operating system Such as SimplMining OS & ethOS, it ... Bitcoin Mining Pc - Wählen Sie dem Sieger. Wir haben viele verschiedene Hersteller ausführlich verglichen und wir zeigen Ihnen hier alle Ergebnisse. Natürlich ist jeder Bitcoin Mining Pc rund um die Uhr bei Amazon.de zu haben und gleich bestellbar. Während einige Händler seit vielen Jahren ausnahmslos noch mit überteuerten Preisen und zudem mit vergleichsweise minderwertiger Qualität ...

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Asrock 13 GPU Mining Monster !!! The H110 Pro BTC+

Take a look at the monstrosity that is the Asrock H110 Pro BTC+ motherboard for Bitcoin and Crypto Currency Mining for currencies like Zcash, Dash, Ethereum and others. This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue ASRock H110 Pro BTC+ is ready to mine right out of box, no need to do any additional bios setup to enable multi GPU mining. Hybrid GPU system is very popular among hardcore miners, this ... Build a Desktop Arcade Machine with Raspberry Pi 3 and Retropie: Super Turbo Pro Edition - Duration: 27:15. Ryan Bates Recommended for you A full and detailed video of my 13 GPU mining rig build. In this video I cover the entire process of building and setting up and mega cryptocoin miner using ...

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