Comparing Money Laundering With ... - Bitcoin Insider

Chilling article in the G8 trade magazine calls governments to outlaw "alternative payment mechanisms, such as Bitcoin and a host of others", because they "can enable criminal and terrorist groups to launder money and fund their operations." (page 60)

submitted by jungle to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Looking for some journal articles on money laundering using Bitcoin

Any help is appreciated
submitted by Cloudsack to moneylaundering [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Did anyone read this article on medium. Money laundering, drugs, polish banks, market manipulation, corrupt exchanges /r/Digibyte

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Did anyone read this article on medium. Money laundering, drugs, polish banks, market manipulation, corrupt exchanges /Digibyte submitted by SimilarAdvantage to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Agents working on Silk Road case charged with theft and money laundering. Believed to have stolen directly from the Silk Road and $300,000 from a californian man, depositing directly into personal accounts. This article is proof that bitcoin can be used to fight corruption in the government.

submitted by Cryptolution to news [link] [comments]

01-30 10:53 - 'Nice try FBI anti-money laundering division /   / Edit: I recommend this really well-written article covering [Tether] - it's mentioned in there, but the risk of government seizure of their assets is a pretty likely o...' by /u/kainzilla removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

'''
Nice try FBI anti-money laundering division
 
Edit: I recommend this really well-written article covering [Tether]1 - it's mentioned in there, but the risk of government seizure of their assets is a pretty likely outcome of publicizing what banks they use, regardless of whether they're running fractional reserve banking
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: kainzilla
1: https://steemit.com/cryptocurrency/@cryptoscopia/making-sense-of-the-tether-situation
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Looking for some journal articles on money laundering using Bitcoin /r/moneylaundering

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Looking for some journal articles on money laundering using Bitcoin /moneylaundering submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins?

A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins? submitted by bitchari to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[#168|+0|1] A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins in India? [/r/india]

[#168|+0|1] A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins in India? [/india] submitted by indiaundelete to indiaundelete [link] [comments]

A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins?

A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins? submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

01-01 09:32 - 'A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins?' (moneycontrol.com) by /u/bitchari removed from /r/Bitcoin within 4192-4197min

A great article and well explained: Why you cannot launder black money using bitcoins?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: bitchari
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

NYT references Bitcoin in online money laundering take-down article - page 2

NYT references Bitcoin in online money laundering take-down article - page 2 submitted by jugiter to planbshow [link] [comments]

@CharlieShrem - List of 7 things wrong with CNNMoney Article "Bitcoin looks primed for money laundering"

submitted by sebicas to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Replace 'Bitcoin' with 'Dollar' and 'Exchanges' with your favorite bank (Chase, BOA, etc..) and this article becomes laughable: Virtual currencies vulnerable to money laundering -U.S. Justice [auto-x-post - OP was podrift]

submitted by fringebot5001 to fringediscussion [link] [comments]

US Banks launder 800X more money than Bitcoin has ever been used to launder. And Bitcoin is the bad guy?

US Banks launder 800X more money than Bitcoin has ever been used to launder. And Bitcoin is the bad guy? submitted by heist95 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Putting $400M of Bitcoin on your company balance sheet

Also posted on my blog as usual. Read it there if you can, there are footnotes and inlined plots.
A couple of months ago, MicroStrategy (MSTR) had a spare $400M of cash which it decided to shift to Bitcoin (BTC).
Today we'll discuss in excrutiating detail why this is not a good idea.
When a company has a pile of spare money it doesn't know what to do with, it'll normally do buybacks or start paying dividends. That gives the money back to the shareholders, and from an economic perspective the money can get better invested in other more promising companies. If you have a huge pile of of cash, you probably should be doing other things than leave it in a bank account to gather dust.
However, this statement from MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor exists to make it clear he's buying into BTC for all the wrong reasons:
“This is not a speculation, nor is it a hedge. This was a deliberate corporate strategy to adopt a bitcoin standard.”
Let's unpack it and jump into the economics Bitcoin:

Is Bitcoin money?

No.
Or rather BTC doesn't act as money and there's no serious future path for BTC to become a form of money. Let's go back to basics. There are 3 main economic problems money solves:
1. Medium of Exchange. Before money we had to barter, which led to the double coincidence of wants problem. When everyone accepts the same money you can buy something from someone even if they don't like the stuff you own.
As a medium of exchange, BTC is not good. There are significant transaction fees and transaction waiting times built-in to BTC and these worsen the more popular BTC get.
You can test BTC's usefulness as a medium of exchange for yourself right now: try to order a pizza or to buy a random item with BTC. How many additional hurdles do you have to go through? How many fewer options do you have than if you used a regular currency? How much overhead (time, fees) is there?
2. Unit of Account. A unit of account is what you compare the value of objects against. We denominate BTC in terms of how many USD they're worth, so BTC is a unit of account presently. We can say it's because of lack of adoption, but really it's also because the market value of BTC is so volatile.
If I buy a $1000 table today or in 2017, it's roughly a $1000 table. We can't say that a 0.4BTC table was a 0.4BTC table in 2017. We'll expand on this in the next point:
3. Store of Value. When you create economic value, you don't want to be forced to use up the value you created right away.
For instance, if I fix your washing machine and you pay me in avocados, I'd be annoyed. I'd have to consume my payment before it becomes brown, squishy and disgusting. Avocado fruit is not good money because avocadoes loses value very fast.
On the other hand, well-run currencies like the USD, GBP, CAD, EUR, etc. all lose their value at a low and most importantly fairly predictible rate. Let's look at the chart of the USD against BTC
While the dollar loses value at a predictible rate, BTC is all over the place, which is bad.
One important use money is to write loan contracts. Loans are great. They let people spend now against their future potential earnings, so they can buy houses or start businesses without first saving up for a decade. Loans are good for the economy.
If you want to sign something that says "I owe you this much for that much time" then you need to be able to roughly predict the value of the debt in at the point in time where it's due.
Otherwise you'll have a hard time pricing the risk of the loan effectively. This means that you need to charge higher interests. The risk of making a loan in BTC needs to be priced into the interest of a BTC-denominated loan, which means much higher interest rates. High interests on loans are bad, because buying houses and starting businesses are good things.

BTC has a fixed supply, so these problems are built in

Some people think that going back to a standard where our money was denominated by a stock of gold (the Gold Standard) would solve economic problems. This is nonsense.
Having control over supply of your currency is a good thing, as long as it's well run.
See here
Remember that what is desirable is low variance in the value, not the value itself. When there are wild fluctuations in value, it's hard for money to do its job well.
Since the 1970s, the USD has been a fiat money with no intrinsic value. This means we control the supply of money.
Let's look at a classic poorly drawn econ101 graph
The market price for USD is where supply meets demand. The problem with a currency based on an item whose supply is fixed is that the price will necessarily fluctuate in response to changes in demand.
Imagine, if you will, that a pandemic strikes and that the demand for currency takes a sharp drop. The US imports less, people don't buy anything anymore, etc. If you can't print money, you get deflation, which is worsens everything. On the other hand, if you can make the money printers go brrrr you can stabilize the price
Having your currency be based on a fixed supply isn't just bad because in/deflation is hard to control.
It's also a national security risk...
The story of the guy who crashed gold prices in North Africa
In the 1200s, Mansa Munsa, the emperor of the Mali, was rich and a devout Muslim and wanted everyone to know it. So he embarked on a pilgrimage to make it rain all the way to Mecca.
He in fact made it rain so hard he increased the overall supply of gold and unintentionally crashed gold prices in Cairo by 20%, wreaking an economic havoc in North Africa that lasted a decade.
This story is fun, the larger point that having your inflation be at the mercy of foreign nations is an undesirable attribute in any currency. The US likes to call some countries currency manipulators, but this problem would be serious under a gold standard.

Currencies are based on trust

Since the USD is based on nothing except the US government's word, how can we trust USD not to be mismanaged?
The answer is that you can probably trust the fed until political stooges get put in place. Currently, the US's central bank managing the USD, the Federal Reserve (the Fed for friends & family), has administrative authority. The fed can say "no" to dumb requests from the president.
People who have no idea what the fed does like to chant "audit the fed", but the fed is already one of the best audited US federal entities. The transcripts of all their meetings are out in the open. As is their balance sheet, what they plan to do and why. If the US should audit anything it's the Department of Defense which operates without any accounting at all.
It's easy to see when a central bank will go rogue: it's when political yes-men are elected to the board.
For example, before printing themselves into hyperinflation, the Venezuelan president appointed a sociologist who publicly stated “Inflation does not exist in real life” and instead is a made up capitalist lie. Note what happened mere months after his gaining control over the Venezuelan currency
This is a key policy. One paper I really like, Sargent (1984) "The end of 4 big inflations" states:
The essential measures that ended hyperinflation in each of Germany,Austria, Hungary, and Poland were, first, the creation of an independentcentral bank that was legally committed to refuse the government'sdemand or additional unsecured credit and, second, a simultaneousalteration in the fiscal policy regime.
In english: *hyperinflation stops when the central bank can say "no" to the government."
The US Fed, like other well good central banks, is run by a bunch of nerds. When it prints money, even as aggressively as it has it does so for good reasons. You can see why they started printing on March 15th as the COVID lockdowns started:
The Federal Reserve is prepared to use its full range of tools to support the flow of credit to households and businesses and thereby promote its maximum employment and price stability goals.
In english: We're going to keep printing and lowering rates until jobs are back and inflation is under control. If we print until the sun is blotted out, we'll print in the shade.

BTC is not gold

Gold is a good asset for doomsday-preppers. If society crashes, gold will still have value.
How do we know that?
Gold has held value throughout multiple historic catastrophes over thousands of years. It had value before and after the Bronze Age Collapse, the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and Gengis Khan being Gengis Khan.
Even if you erased humanity and started over, the new humans would still find gold to be economically valuable. When Europeans d̶i̶s̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ c̶o̶n̶q̶u̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ g̶e̶n̶o̶c̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ went to America, they found gold to be an important item over there too. This is about equivalent to finding humans on Alpha-Centauri and learning that they think gold is a good store of value as well.
Some people are puzzled at this: we don't even use gold for much! But it has great properties:
First, gold is hard to fake and impossible to manufacture. This makes it good to ascertain payment.
Second, gold doesnt react to oxygen, so it doesn't rust or tarnish. So it keeps value over time unlike most other materials.
Last, gold is pretty. This might sound frivolous, and you may not like it, but jewelry has actual value to humans.
It's no coincidence if you look at a list of the wealthiest families, a large number of them trade in luxury goods.
To paraphrase Veblen humans have a profound desire to signal social status, for the same reason peacocks have unwieldy tails. Gold is a great way to achieve that.
On the other hand, BTC lacks all these attributes. Its value is largely based on common perception of value. There are a few fundamental drivers of demand:
Apart from these, it's hard to argue that BTC will retain value throughout some sort of economic catastrophe.

BTC is really risky

One last statement from Michael Saylor I take offense to is this:
“We feel pretty confident that Bitcoin is less risky than holding cash, less risky than holding gold,” MicroStrategy CEO said in an interview
"BTC is less risky than holding cash or gold long term" is nonsense. We saw before that BTC is more volatile on face value, and that as long as the Fed isn't run by spider monkeys stacked in a trench coat, the inflation is likely to be within reasonable bounds.
But on top of this, BTC has Abrupt downside risks that normal currencies don't. Let's imagine a few:

Blockchain solutions are fundamentally inefficient

Blockchain was a genius idea. I still marvel at the initial white paper which is a great mix of economics and computer science.
That said, blockchain solutions make large tradeoffs in design because they assume almost no trust between parties. This leads to intentionally wasteful designs on a massive scale.
The main problem is that all transactions have to be validated by expensive computational operations and double checked by multiple parties. This means waste:
Many design problems can be mitigated by various improvements over BTC, but it remains that a simple database always works better than a blockchain if you can trust the parties to the transaction.
submitted by VodkaHaze to badeconomics [link] [comments]

Cash: use it or lose it!

Is this the last decade of cash?

The corona pandemic is not helping. Belgian media is picking up the Australian news about the coronavirus found active 28 days on banknotes, without understanding that the 28 days is on the Australian polymer and paper banknotes, while Euro banknotes are made of cotton fibers on which the coronavirus gets inactive rather quick. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-04-euro-banknotes-safe-coronavirus-ecb.html
You are touching so much in shops, including the pay terminals everyone is touching, that cash won't add much risk.

Until this year, I used to not care, and pay everything electronically.

But in March I became the victim of an identity theft. My bank account was frozen, my bank cards and payment app blocked. Opening new bank accounts or credit cards was impossible due to being on a blacklist.

My employer could not pay my salary in cash. For most professions this is forbidden by law since 2016.

Friends lent me cash. But I discovered cash was refused at supermarkets, shops, public transport, parkings, fuel stations, hospital, physiotherapist, online webshops, Uber, Deliveroo, etc. Sometimes because of corona anxiety, but often already from before 2020.

Prepaid cards could be a nice solution. But even while they are debit cards, in Belgium they seem to be refused where credit cards are refused, since they are Visa or Mastercards cards. These are refused in many Belgium places, since merchants don't like the higher costs. Not many prepaid cards allow charging with cash. And their availability is in recent decline: this year at least the following prepaid cards stopped or are announced to stop: Carrefour prepaid Flex card, BNP and Hello. The decline might be due to new very strict EU anti-money laundering laws. The anonymous prepaid cards (and generic gift cards) are now restricted to 100 euro maximum recharge in their lifetime and 50 euro payments.

Cryptocurrencies are also in theory a nice solution. But their acceptance in Belgium is extremely limited. Thanks to Takeaway accepting bitcoin, I could order delivery from many local snack restaurants.
But I discovered that bitcoin and most other cryptocurrencies, while having an "anonymous" reputation, are actually only pseudonymous and extremely open and transparent: for every transaction the origin address, destination address, amount and timestamp are recorded for eternity in a public ledger for everyone open to consult. When I buy something, the merchant can see how many coins I have in my wallet address. Buying, spending or selling coins are activities that can get your name connected to your addresses. Developers try to solve this privacy issue, but I'm afraid the war on anonymity (related to the war on cash) will crush that before cryptocurrency payments become popular.

So, my identity theft experience has awakened me: sharing your personal details in so many places caries a lot of danger. Think about it: while the law became more strict, there are still many (online) shops and restaurants taking knowledge of your credit card number, expiry date, CCV and your name. That's still enough information to do fraudulent payments in many places.

The cashless society is a surveillance society, with every payment traced. And it creates a lot of dependencies: electricity, internet, and permission by the banking and payment system. Once you are on a blacklist, even if you did nothing wrong, but somebody pretended to be you and did fraudulent payments, you are screwed for at least months.

So, now that I'm finally off the blacklist, I opened several bank accounts. That will not help for all issues, but still: having only 1 bank is really dangerous.

And from now on I pay everything possible with cash. Not just to keep my personal details safe, but also to keep the cash usage statistics high. Did you notice that the financial sector is regulary reporting the cash withdrawals decline? They report both the total amount withdrawn and the number of withdrawals.

I learned that the bank and payment processors are fighting a war on cash and they are actively lobbying the government for a reduction of the cash payment limit to 50 euro. Yes, an insane fifty euro! The banks are lazy about cash and want to impose negative rent without risking a bankrun. No cash is no bankrun. The payment processors just love the percentage they get from every payment.

Currently the acceptance of euro banknotes and coins for debts is compulsory by European law. But many merchants violated the law and we had at least one Belgian minister ignoring the enforcement. See e.g. this article from 2019: https://www.bruzz.be/samenleving/no-cash-doet-intrede-brusselse-horeca-2019-05-10.
The law has exceptions, e.g. for security reasons such as a pandemic. After the pandemic I will try to report all cash refusing merchants.
Merchants that refuse to accept cash payments can be reported at https://meldpunt.belgie.be or https://pointdecontact.belgique.be/. But I guess it is better to wait until after the pandemic.

We need to defend the right to use cash. And a crucial action to avoid the end of cash is to keep using it as much as possible.

Every time you pay with a bank card or app, you contribute to a cashless future where:
Use cash or lose it!
submitted by piabxl to belgium [link] [comments]

The first casualty of "war" is the truth

https://coingeek.com/the-war-on-bitcoin/
The son of a pig farmer-turned mogul
Calvin Ayre's father, Ken, was arrested in 1987 for internationally smuggling a third of a ton of marijuana. He was sentenced to 4 years in prison.
https://archive.macleans.ca/article/2007/4/2/imploding-lenders-and-toxic-loans
Calvin was an unindicted co-conspirator who the judge repeatedly said was undoubtedly involved.
https://www.pressreader.com/canada/vancouver-sun/20060922/283210143719636
Obviously such a circumstance carries no legal weight, as Calvin Ayre never had his day in court, but he has had other legal troubles despite the claims in this article where he was "modernizing laws"
Ayre helped modernize complicated and outdated U.S. financial laws by pushing the envelope into the gray markets that exist where U.S. dollars are used across borders to engage in legally complicated commerce like gambling.
In reality, Calvin Ayre was banned from participating in publicly traded companies in British Columbia for TWENTY YEARS. He committed insider trading, lied to regulators, and employed a felon who was on parole after years in prison for stock fraud, doing business with him with full knowledge of this for years.
Then he launched Bodog which eventually turned into all the money laundering charges etc...
As one can see, someone who has close links with a convicted drug trafficker who personally was charged and plead out money laundering charges is not exactly the sort of situation that US banking and big business is clamoring to join.
That's simply a factual statement: disqualification under KYC + AML doesn't require actual criminal convictions. Internal regulatory due diligence alone would mean that people like Calvin Ayre would be facing an extraordinarily difficult hurdle.
submitted by Annuit-bitscoin to bsv [link] [comments]

Blockchain Technology & Its Use In Banking Sector

Link to Businessworld article: http://www.businessworld.in/article/Block-Chain-Technology-its-use-in-Banking-Secto26-10-2020-335662/
In the coming years, Blockchain will spread exponentially to the financial industry. The industry is also investigating the exponential use of Blockchain instances. Blockchain is just not about Bitcoin, but there's a lot more to it yet to be found.
In the words of Olawale Daniel, “ Blockchain technology is a form of digitalized, de-centralized public record of all cryptocurrency transactions. Blockchain was designed to record, not just financial-related information, but virtually everything of value.”
A blockchain is a digital transaction record. The name is derived from its structure, in which individual records, called blocks, are connected together in a single list, called a chain. Blockchains are used to record transactions made with cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, and have many other applications. In simple terms, Blockchain is a method for managing and storing information in a way that makes it difficult or impossible to change, hack, or cheat the network. A blockchain is basically a digital transaction record that is duplicated and distributed across the entire network of computer systems on the blockchain.
Banking sectors are moving from their traditional methods of securities to high-tech securities. Industry has started experimenting with blockchain by replicating current asset transactions on the blockchain. Although this gives some room for the effectiveness of the blockchain solution. In infrastructure terms, Blockchain is an open source software designed to support the transfer of digital assets among market participants in real time. Using any chosen blockchain APIs, one may demonstrate a drastic decrease in asset transfer costs and timelines.
The main advantages of Blockchain technology in banking sector are that it improves efficiency, enhances security, unchangeable records, quick transaction time and no third party involvement thus decreasing costs.
One of the main advantages of blockchain is the history of immutable transactions. Any purchases that have been made once cannot be removed. This will help to reduce much of the crimes committed against financial institutions.Blockchain uses the Smart Contracts principle. It includes a set of laws by which the parties involved in the contract and agree to deal with each other. It allows any kind of digital information to be stored and allows the party to access or modify data only in accordance with a set of predefined rules.
Many financial firms pay millions of dollars a year to retain all their consumer records. But blockchain allows all the information to be stored in one location. This guarantees the dignity and non-repudiation of the stored data. It allows organizations to access the verification information of a specific customer from another organization and thus avoids duplication of data.
Blockchain increases the processing speed of transactions. The distributed existence eliminates the need for intermediaries to authorize financial transactions between consumers. This offers a cheaper and easier way to exchange currency at lower rates than bank charges.
It is the safest way to avoid fraud, money laundering and promises. In the coming years, Blockchain will spread exponentially to the financial industry. The industry is also investigating the exponential use of Blockchain instances. Blockchain is just not about Bitcoin, but there's a lot more to it yet to be found.
submitted by BlockDotCo to u/BlockDotCo [link] [comments]

Block Chain Technology & Its Use In Banking Sector

Link to original article: http://www.businessworld.in/article/Block-Chain-Technology-its-use-in-Banking-Secto26-10-2020-335662/
In the coming years, Blockchain will spread exponentially to the financial industry. The industry is also investigating the exponential use of Blockchain instances. Blockchain is just not about Bitcoin, but there's a lot more to it yet to be found.
In the words of Olawale Daniel, “ Blockchain technology is a form of digitalized, de-centralized public record of all cryptocurrency transactions. Blockchain was designed to record, not just financial-related information, but virtually everything of value.”
A blockchain is a digital transaction record. The name is derived from its structure, in which individual records, called blocks, are connected together in a single list, called a chain. Blockchains are used to record transactions made with cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, and have many other applications. In simple terms, Blockchain is a method for managing and storing information in a way that makes it difficult or impossible to change, hack, or cheat the network. A blockchain is basically a digital transaction record that is duplicated and distributed across the entire network of computer systems on the blockchain.
Banking sectors are moving from their traditional methods of securities to high-tech securities. Industry has started experimenting with blockchain by replicating current asset transactions on the blockchain. Although this gives some room for the effectiveness of the blockchain solution. In infrastructure terms, Blockchain is an open source software designed to support the transfer of digital assets among market participants in real time. Using any chosen blockchain APIs, one may demonstrate a drastic decrease in asset transfer costs and timelines.
The main advantages of Blockchain technology in banking sector are that it improves efficiency, enhances security, unchangeable records, quick transaction time and no third party involvement thus decreasing costs.
One of the main advantages of blockchain is the history of immutable transactions. Any purchases that have been made once cannot be removed. This will help to reduce much of the crimes committed against financial institutions.Blockchain uses the Smart Contracts principle. It includes a set of laws by which the parties involved in the contract and agree to deal with each other. It allows any kind of digital information to be stored and allows the party to access or modify data only in accordance with a set of predefined rules.
Many financial firms pay millions of dollars a year to retain all their consumer records. But blockchain allows all the information to be stored in one location. This guarantees the dignity and non-repudiation of the stored data. It allows organizations to access the verification information of a specific customer from another organization and thus avoids duplication of data.
Blockchain increases the processing speed of transactions. The distributed existence eliminates the need for intermediaries to authorize financial transactions between consumers. This offers a cheaper and easier way to exchange currency at lower rates than bank charges.
It is the safest way to avoid fraud, money laundering and promises. In the coming years, Blockchain will spread exponentially to the financial industry. The industry is also investigating the exponential use of Blockchain instances. Blockchain is just not about Bitcoin, but there's a lot more to it yet to be found.
submitted by BlockDotCo to u/BlockDotCo [link] [comments]

Navigating the rough waters in SSR’s case - What’s next? How can we support? Please read!

We may have to fight multiple battles to win the war!
We started this people’s movement since June 14, 2020 to get justice for Sushant Singh Rajput.
From day 1, we had been running from pillars to posts requesting justice as we all knew he didn’t die by suicide based on the circumstantial evidences we had in hand. We kept screaming loudly so our voices can be heard. We all had a goal since day 1. Our goal was clear and we created agendas to win each battle in this war of justice for Sushant Singh Rajput.
After almost 1 month of screaming since Sushant’s death, Dr. Subramanian Swamy, Ishkaran Singh Bandari and Republic picked up the news and it started gaining momentum since then. That was the 1st ever battle we won.
After continuously and collectively keeping our voices up, we heard the news that Supreme Court passed the verdict to hand over the case to CBI. This is when we won our 2nd battle.
What now?
Are we running around like a headless chicken? May be!
In-between all these battles, there were periods where we were doing some basic investigation with our limited online resources and fanatical minds.
With large amount of speculations and some authentic discoveries, we were hopping continuously between -
• Drug Trafficking • Human Sex Trafficking • Money Laundering using Bitcoin/Cryptocurrency • Terrorism • AI Designs and Coding • PR related Issue etc., 
Honestly, all these crimes exist in Underworld-Bollywood today! We cannot deny that.
But, due to our limited resources, we really cannot pin down and say this IS the motive behind Sushant’s murder. This case is beyond online information. We are at a stage where finding companies and linking it to articles online will not help...not at this time! We have done our best so far in finding the leads and connecting the dots. To go beyond this info or follow this trail is impossible by sitting at home!
What next?
Let us leave the proper investigation to CBI, ED and any other institution that is part of this case. They’re officials for a reason and they definitely know much much better than us because that is their JOB!
How can we support?
• We will have to WAIT, and be alert. • We must stay UNITED throughout this case. It will be time consuming. There may be dull days and we may even lie low sometimes when other critical issues takes precedence. We should understand that and let it pass. But, we must stay united no matter what for Sushant’s cause. His family needs our support! • We must continue to RAISE OUR VOICES to support the cause via all social media platforms and consistently maintain the social media pressure. • We will continue to CALL OUT the BS witnesses the media channels and PRs bring on board. • If CBI/ED/NIA confirms a MOTIVE, then we can proceed on that angle to find more leads. • We must keep the movement ALIVE.
We need to fight many more battles to win the war! Do NOT lose hope!
Peace and strength to everyone! Let justice prevail!
submitted by kladle to JusticeforSSR [link] [comments]

UK’s ban on crypto derivatives trading won’t affect the users much

UK’s ban on crypto derivatives trading won’t affect the users much

UK’s ban on crypto derivatives trading won’t affect the users much
The promotion of investment ICO bitcoin derivatives and other digital assets to retail traders is being prohibited in the United Kingdom by the Financial Conduct Authority. It is an additional blow to the flourishing STO cryptocurrency world, after the US authorities impeached the proprietors of BitMex, top derivatives exchange for functioning without registration and supposedly failing to observe AML, anti-money-laundering guidelines.
The FCA is thwarting retail traders from purchasing and dealing the likes of digital asset futures and options generally used to hedge their stakes on an underlying crypto. For instance, buying an option and selling them if the values decrease by 10%, offering you insurance if the market goes against you. The FCA stated it was bringing the prohibition as amateur traders are at danger of sudden losses. The thought process is amateurs do not comprehend the market so lots of financial crime can be pulled off harming their interests, also cryptos are unpredictable and hard to evaluate.
The boycott is not broadened to professional investors and institutional companies like hedge funds, which can handle dodgier financial cryptos than the general public. The ban protects people drawn to token asset offering BTC thinking it is the money of the future, following the dramatic news reporting about the upsurge and dips. Many trading portals provide lucid entry into crypto and social media influencers encourage commoners to undertake complex tradingread continue....
submitted by cryptobusinessworld to u/cryptobusinessworld [link] [comments]

Area 51 Hentai Raid

Area 51 Hentai Raid submitted by choppa790bot to Gamingcirclejerk [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Money Laundering  #LIVE AMA with Simon Dixon ... Why don’t corrupt officials use Bitcoin for money ... Cryptocurrency & Money Laundering - YouTube How To Launder Bitcoin  Silicon Real $4 Billion 💰 Bitcoin Money Laundering Operation Revealed ...

A great place to start on the connections between BTC and money laundering is with this Bitcoin Magazine article from 2013. Bitcoin has long held a reputation for facilitating dubious transactions — thanks to its pseudonymity and privacy protections, BTC was the currency of choice for the world’s most prolific darknet market, Silk Road. Silk Road was such a prominent fixture in the Bitcoin ... Bae Systems, Bitcoin, Cryptocurrency, Follow The Money report, Money Laundering, Money mules, Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) Image Credits : Shutterstock ... Bitcoin’s public and pseudo-anonymous nature has reduced its preference for laundering cash. However, folks still ‘try their best’ to route money using BTC. And often fail. €29 Million Worth of Bitcoin Seized Following Money Laundering Schemes Laundering money with Bitcoin is actually an ineffective strategy because of its complexity and high risk. There is no doubt that digital currencies provide benefits for an individual, a company and an institution by facilitating better access to financial products and services. Money laundering costs the global economy between $800 billion and $2 trillion annually, according to a United ... A couple from Hilversum, Netherlands have been convicted of money laundering after using bitcoin on dark web services. The Rotterdam District Court ordered the couple to forfeit 2,532 BTC and €250,000 ($295,256). According to court documents, the convicts swapped cash for bitcoin from anonymous customers in busy fast-food restaurants.

[index] [39445] [3015] [26850] [9751] [28427] [26609] [3556] [36870] [22086] [44265]

Bitcoin and Money Laundering #LIVE AMA with Simon Dixon ...

**On today's episode of The Cryptoverse:** We’ll check in on the progress to Segwit lock in. And the MtGox case has been cracked wide open thanks to new repo... $4 Billion 💰 Bitcoin Money Laundering Operation Revealed Involving Alexander Vinnik and BTC-E - Duration: 12:41. The Cryptoverse 12,440 views. 12:41. Jim Rogers ... The digital currency Bitcoin has been making headlines this week after a huge increase in value, but ministers are to introduce tighter regulations on the vi... If asked right now, can you explain what money laundering is? More importantly, did you know that money laundering is the reason for pizza in USA? In this vi... Recap of everything Bitcoin for October 23nd 2020 Timecodes: 00:00 - Intro 00:19 - Bitcoin Stats 00:51 - Daily Fail 04:04 - Meme Review 07:28 - News 15:16 - ...

#